A Winner for the Developers’ Challenge: Patrick Juola

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John Bradley
12.07.2010
After the three judges (Geoffrey Rockwell, Michael Sperberg-McQueen, Tobias Blanke) reviewed the entries to the Developers’ Challenge, they chose a winner, and it was announced at the DH2010 final banquet, on Saturday evening , 10th July. It was Patrick Juola (Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Duquesne University) for his piece of software called “Once Upon a Time/Monkeying Around” — a game based on computer linguistic methods that could be applied ...

Digital history

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tla
05.07.2010
As a historian who can very easily be mistaken for a philologist, I have recently been pondering the question of what technology can do for the field of history.  Digital tools have proven themselves in quite a few surrounding fields – archaeology, philology, text criticism and analysis.  But can we also use computers to help us put all this disparate data together?  Can we use computers to help us keep ...

Critical Mass in Social DH Applications

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wybo
05.07.2010
What have you done to attract users to your (community centered / interactive / web 2.0) digital humanities application? What do you think could be done to attract users to such an application? What have you seen others do? What worked, what didn’t?

Using online social tools to bring practitioners and researchers closer together

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techczech
05.07.2010
What: The idea is simple. We could probably use a platform for connecting researchers and practitioners that would break down the client/provider relationship currently embedded in the so-called ‘evidence-based’ practice and possibly put more emphasis on an ‘inquiry-based’ practice. I’d be interested in talking with people about what such a platform would look like. This is is possibly related to: http://thatcamplondon.org/2010/06/participatory-interdisciplinary-and-digital but with some differences (see below) Background assumptions: There are broadly three stages to ...

Living digitized archives for individuals and learning

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mad_rabbit
05.07.2010
Being a digital media developer/programmer who has worked with museums and other organisations on various projects, I have used media such as digital/digitized photos, films and audio clips/interviews, for the process, which has been collected from (often older) people by the museum/organisation for educational/archival purposes, often for use with schools. I am also a researcher working on a project (and planning projects) that look at the ways in which older people ...

The French Digital Humanities Manifesto

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marind
05.07.2010
THATCamp Paris, in 2010 May, wrote a Manifesto as a French contribution to Centernet Summit, to THATCamp London and to DH2010. Is this Manifesto useful for the DH future? Do you agree with it? Would you sign it? Would you promote it? Would you mofidy it? If we want DH to be an international deep movement, we need to define our aims, our values, our methods and our beliefs. Let’s ...

Create an archive/library app wish list – discussion proposl

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richardd
05.07.2010
Following on from Alexandra Eveleigh’s call to archivists (and librarians) to herd or be herded (being heard more by the wider world would also be nice) I would like to suggest a discussion on useful new apps, in particular to discuss and create an archive or librarian app wish list. What one app would reach out and would make people more aware and/or facilitate archive/library use? Perhaps this ...

Organising knowledge and resources online

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gerben
04.07.2010
One of the things I am very much interested in is how scholars find and use information on the internet. More and more the ability to effectively query online information seems to have an impact on the quality of research. I have built two academic portals with Drupal and so have some experience with organising knowledge, or access to knowledge, online for particular fields & resources (see European History Primary ...

Wikifying bibliography

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epiktistes
04.07.2010
I’m intrigued by what wikis can offer as a critical tool, as an embodiment of evolutionary bibliography. Pop-culture fandom is way ahead of the curve here, with sites such as the Buffyverse and Lostpedia tracking every bit of minutiae relating to their respective storyworlds, but there are many bodies of “classical” literature, such as Balzac’s Comedie Humaine, that could benefit from the hyperlinking and visualization capabilities afforded by the wiki ...

Re-using Open Access data

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Gabriel Bodard
04.07.2010
I would like to propose a session to discuss (and put into practice) the re-use and repurposing of Open Access data. As a starting point, I’d take some of the Classical and other datasets made available for the Developers’ Challenge, and see how they can be exploited with text mining, searching and indexing, aggregating, disambiguating, improving, turning into Linked Data, and otherwise using in ways that the original creators might ...